Sunday, April 25, 2010

With Heartfelt Thanks

For keeping my interview on yesterday's "Drew Marshall Show" in your thoughts and prayers. The experience was truly exciting, unforgettably so. Both Drew and his co-host, Tim, couldn't have been more gracious and forthcoming. And the responses I've received thus far have been uniformly positive. None of this would have been possible without your constant kindness and support. You are great blessing to me and everyone who finds this place.

Now we join hands and hearts, praying any seeds of hope and reconciliation planted by the program will grow and reproduce. Our God is truly a great God, an Opener of doors that no one can close, a Rewarder of those who seek Him!

As soon as the audio archive of Drew's discussion with me is posted, I'll be swift to pass it along. Thank you again. May God reward you richly.

Tim

11 comments:

genevieve said...

I'm happy that all went well, Tim.

Leonardo Ricardo said...

Any negative attacks?

Edgington said...

We'll be anxious to hear it.

Tim said...

Thanks, Genevieve!

Leo, absolutely not. It was very apparent from calls to an earlier segment that Drew has his share of gay-unfriendly listeners, but none of that spirit or mentality filtered into our conversation. (He most definitely is not unfriendly to anyone. )

Drew has a healthy degree of skepticism about all expressions of faith, and that makes him a perfect conversational partner, actually. So there were several questions that started, "So how would you answer the "Jesus Crowd" that says..." etc. I wouldn't say he was "baiting" me, but clearly if I were an arm-waving, confrontational sort I could have counterattacked. Since I'm not (thank God) the conversation kept skewing back toward less-discussed aspects of oft-discussed issues.

Example: Q: "What's your litmus test for homophobia? I'll be honest if one of my sons told me he was gay, I'm not sure I'd be cool with it."
A: "Drew, the problem with homophobia isn't the "homo." It's the "phobia." So I would ask you, what are you afraid of? And since you're a believer, I'd also ask you why are you afraid, since 1 John tells us 'there is no fear in love, because love has to do with punishment.'"

All the juicy stuff came up--how do I know I'm gay, the sin question, the leather community, gay marriage, etc. But as you know from knowing me so long, I kept pressing against the stereotypes and rushed judgments by steering back to faith and sound reasoning.

None of the credit goes to me, of course. It was just a blessing that fell in the right place at the right time!

Can't wait for both of you to get a listen to the archive and hear what you think!

Peace,
Tim

Tim said...

Mariah and Byron, I'm chomping at the bit to share it! As soon as it's posted, I'll link it here!

Peace,
Tim

Leonardo Ricardo said...

Thanks, I await.

Leonardo (I also love and am inspired by Jesse Jackson)

Tim said...

Leonardo, I'm checking Drew's site regularly; will give a shout when we've got it. (And your regard for Rev. Jackson is not unexpected, as your passions and his are practically identical!)

Peace,
Tim

gmc said...

Hey Tim,

One of the key aspects in the discussion was your point that homosexuality isn't about sex - it's about identity.

Unhappily many straight folk have come to associate "gay" with an ultra-flamboyant, sexually-promiscuous lifestyle. I guess it's because the gay folks who had the courage and personality to bare it all (bad pun? oops) - to come out of the closet and to push for changes, were by necessity those sorts of personalities to begin with? Anyway ....

When you helped Drew (and other straights like me) to separate that issue from the gay identity issue, things get clearer and less provocative. Now we have found common ground in Christ and we can actually discuss openly, without rancor, the more important aspects of the issues.

You did a great job and I look forward to the archive being posted so others can take it in.

Tim said...

I fully agree, Grant. There is a fascination with the mechanics that misses the real point. When we get that, however, our differences are not so great--and our needs are exactly the same.

Re the "flamboyant" people among us; I think that's the same, too. Leaders across all genders and cultures tend to be larger-than-life and unrestrained by "rules." While this doesn't excuse promiscuity, pride, etc., it is a factor that often gets ignored in the sex/gender debates.

One of the best examples of how the identity issue gets muddled, I think, is this: FDR, JFK, and Clinton were all engaged in adulterous affairs while in office. While Clinton's behavior was exposed soon afterward and therefore treated as "scandal," history has managed to forgive their indiscretions as "flaws," not "promiscuity." Why? Because their identity transcended their behavior. Had any of them been gay, I'm not sure this would have been the case. (Harvey Milk or Barney Frank would probably agree.)

Another point I stress about our flamboyant crowd is one you make. The gay rights movement started with them; their fearlessness during the Stonewall Riots made this site and discussion possible. And while many of my GLBT brothers and sisters wish they would be less visible (during Pride events, etc.) I find them essential--despite the negativity associated with them--for the very same reason I find it essential for us to remember Jesus's crowd was full of unconventional types: publicans and prostitutes and other fringe-dwellers. Change for the common good is often wrought by those who are commonly disparaged. It's God's way, I think.

Grant, again, I thank you for all your support, encouragement, and help in this endeavor. You are a God-send to all of us!

Blessings,
Tim

gmc said...

re: "Because their identity transcended their behavior"

That's a great thought. It harkens back to all of us finding our true identity in Christ and through his nature, our behaviours (all of us), can be transcended. I may have to borrow that line if you don't mind.

I think you are accurate in your assessment about leaders as well. Thanks for sharing your insights.

Tim said...

Thanks, Grant. What's mine is yours--borrow away!